Open Sources Guelph - July 30, 2020

3Aug

This week on Open Sources Guelph, it's going to be a Canadian affair with a splash of conspiracy. From coast to coast to coast, people are talking about the controversy that rhymes with "Me", but there are concerns in select localities including questions about mass murder on the East coast, and questions about the limits of Free Speech in Alberta. And speaking of Free Speech, yes, we have to talk again about conspiracies.

 

This Thursday, July 30, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

 

WE Are What WE Are. It was a big week for the still ongoing scandal involving the Federal government's decision to allow the WE Charity to administer nearly a billion dollars for youth volunteerism. The Kielburger Brothers testified Tuesday as they try to valiantly save their non-profit's reputation, if not its very existence, while Prime Minister Justin Trudeau himself will testify just before showtime on Thursday. So where does the story go from here, and will there be any lessons learned?

 

Under Pressure. David Bowie and Queen must have been in the back of the head of the Nova Scotia government this week as they finally announced a public inquiry into the April massacre there, which is still the worst mass shooting in Canadian history. Originally, they were going to go with a simple review, but immense public pressure forced them to change their minds. So will a public inquiry get the answers people need, and will the government's heart really be in it?

 

Kill Bill 1. A few weeks ago, the Alberta government passed Bill 1, or the Protecting Critical Infrastructure Defence Act. Sounds pretty innocuous, right? Well, don't tell that to environmentalists in the Wild Rose province because they smell a rat, a rat designed to stop them from exercising their right to protest big oil and pipelines. So is Alberta and Jason Kenney using the pandemic as an excuse to stifle Free Expression for their friends in the fossil fuel business?

 

Fake Drastic Expertise. A viral video posted Monday night featured a group of people in front of the Supreme Court of the United States (?) talking about how everything that real medical professionals have told you about COVID-19 is wrong. It's another in a long line of conspiracy theories concerning the pandemic we've heard, and they're made worse because they're amplified by the President of United States. Will anything break this conspiratorial stranglehold on people?

 

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - July 29, 2020 (Colour Out of Space)

31Jul

This week on End Credits, we're all about the Colour. It's not real, but it is spectacular, and it's the basis for this week's review, Colour Out of Space, which is now streaming on Netflix. Before that though, we will finish off our ultimate ranking of Spielberg film, and there may be some discussion about a tough weekend for loses in the film industry.

 

This Wednesday, July 29, at 3 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Tim Phillips will discuss:

 

Uneven Stevens Part 3 of 3. Forty-five years ago this summer, Steven Spielberg changed movies forever with the release of Jaws, and that was merely just another step on his run as the most successful filmmaker in 125 years of cinematic history. This week we continue the definitive* ranking of Spielberg’s films with the Top 10. (*May not actually be definitive.)

 

REVIEW: Colour Out of Space (2020). The works of H.P. Lovecraft have been hugely influential, but they've not been easily adaptable, which is why Colour Out of Space is such a unique product. Well, there's also the mythic careers or director Richard Stanley and star Nicolas Cage, but mostly it's the Lovecraft, and his timely interpretation of humanity as just another cog in the cosmic machine. So is this Colour as spectacular and terrifying as advertised?

 

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 3 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #231 – Big Concerns for Small Business

29Jul

This week, we’re going to talk about small business, and we’re going to talk about it from two sides: the nation-wide trends on how entrepreneurs are trying to survive the pandemic, and a unique local example from a small business owner who has loudly and publicly asked for more help as we’re entering this important recovery phase of the crisis. How's business? It's complicated.

 

If you’re an entrepreneur running your own small business, and especially if that business depends on the regular traffic into a bricks and mortar storefront, these are very tough times. Three quarters of all small businesses in Canada have been forced to carry some kind of debt because of COVID-19, and according to the Canadian Federation of Independent Business (CFIB), that debt now sits at $117 billion altogether. How are small businesses going to overcome this and other challenges?

 

We're going to get help answering that from two people this week. First, we will focus on the big picture with Ryan Mallough, the Ontario Director of Provincial Affairs for the CFIB. Mallough will talk about the worst case scenario for small business, the potential for a “second wave” of business closures in the fall as certain government measures expire, and the best ways that small businesses can overcome COVID challenges, especially in the digital realm.

 

After that, we will hear from Ryan Brooks, who is the CEO and founder of Ctrl V, a virtual reality arcade with nearly 20 different locations across North America. Brooks will talk about why he sent out an email to Ctrl V customers about getting more Federal and Provincial government action to support small businesses, and what those governments have done so far that’s been both helpful and unhelpful. Brooks will also talk about the effects of the pandemic on his own small business, and what factors will make or break some of the various Ctrl V franchises.

 

So let's talk about the challenges of small business, and the possible solutions, on this week's Guelph Politicast!

 

To learn more about the Canadian Federation of Independent Business click here, and to learn more about Ctrl V click here. To read the email that Ryan Brooks sent out to customers to rally support for small businesses from the government, click here.

 

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

 

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - July 23, 2020

27Jul

This week on Open Sources Guelph, we are once again overwhelmed by the dregs of living in the year 2020. On the one hand, we've got stormtroopers on the streets of American cities, and a burgeoning blowback of abuse and assault allegations here in Canada. On top of that, we've got work issues in spite of the pandemic, and those pesky fascistic and colonial statues aren't going anywhere. What happened to a slow, summer news week?

 

This Thursday, July 23, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

 

Portland oh-no! The most active of the Black Lives Matter protests have died down, so why were the streets of Portland, Oregon filled with unidentifiable government goons putting activists into unmarked cars? No one knows who these people are, or what agency they're a part of, but it goes all the way up to President Donald Trump. Is this performative fascism for the camera, or is this a warm-up act for actual fascism pre-election in November?

 

#MouAussi. It hasn't really broken through into English Canada yet, but there is a MeToo reckoning happening now in Quebec. With a couple of exceptions, like Simple Plan bassist David Desrosiers, the majority of the accused are not well known outside of Quebec's insular celebrity culture, but that's not the only thing that's different about Quebec, where it's much easier for people to sue for libel even if the allegations are proven true. What can we learn from this new phase of MeToo?

 

Work Weak? We've reached the point in the pandemic where we're talking about how to get people back to work, and while the Federal government has extended the payout period for the Canadian Emergency Benefit Response, business owners are now shaking their fists because people are getting paid more to not go to work and stay safe. What's missing from the debate? If people are feeling that they're not paid enough to risk going to work, shouldn't we be talking about paying them more?

 

Statue of Limitations. More statue news this week as three protestors were taken into custody in Toronto for painting a Sir John A. MacDonald statue at Queen's Park pink, meanwhile Halton Regional Police were investigating the defacement of a Nazi monument in Oakville as a hate crime. Wait a minute, there's a Nazi monument in Oakville? You better believe it, which is another thing we've discovered about ourselves in another difficult week of reassessing our racial biases.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - July 22, 2020 (Relic)

24Jul

This week on End Credits, even though we're in the middle of another summer heat wave, this new episode of the show might send a chill down your spine. For our review this week, we're going to discuss the new family-bases horror flick Relic, and before that we will continue our career recap of the man with the beard (and the box office).

 

This Wednesday, July 22, at 3 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Candice Lepage will discuss:

 

Uneven Stevens Part 2 of 3. Forty-five years ago this summer, Steven Spielberg changed movies forever with the release of Jaws, and that was merely just another step on his run as the most successful filmmaker in 125 years of cinematic history. This week we continue the definitive* ranking of Spielberg’s films with the middle 11. (*May not actually be definitive.)

 

REVIEW: Relic (2020). It would be insulting to call the trend of high brow horror movies "smart horror", but this week we have another example of the best of the art form. Relic tells the story about three generations of woman coping with the deteriorating mental condition of the matriarch, but are the weird things happening in the house the fault of dementia, or is it the fault of some supernatural presence? Here's a question: Why not both?

 

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 3 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #230 - Messaging on a Bottle

22Jul

It’s hard to imagine a more personal environmental issue for many in Guelph than water. We’re a community that gets our drinking water from ground sources, and that means we have to be even more guarded about potential threats to those sources, which has long included private water taking operations. Some big changes are coming in that sector as you might have heard, and we’re going to get perspective from an activist and a politician.

 

A few weeks ago, the Government of Ontario announced proposed changes to water taking in Ontario, and around that same time Nestle Waters announced that they’re selling their water bottling operations in Canada. To water protection advocates, it’s like hell froze over twice!

 

Way back in 2016, the water taking contract between the Province and Nestle Waters operation in Aberfoyle expired. Still, Nestle has been taking water for the last four years, and all the Ontario government has done in the mean time is put a moratorium on new water taking permits, a moratorium that carried over when the new government took over in 2018. Now that moratorium is set to expire, and Nestle is selling its water bottling operations in Canada to a Shelburne company. What the heck’s going on?

 

To answer that, and other questions, we will be joined on this week's podcast by Robert Case, who is the chair of the Wellington Water Watchers, and Guelph MPP and Green Party of Ontario leader Mike Schreiner. We will hear from Case about his thoughts on Nestle leaving Canada, and whether Nestle is the canary in the coalmine for the profitability of bottled water. Then, we will hear from Schreiner as he talks about the politics being played by the Ontario government, and where this issue sits in terms of other government action on the environment.

 

So let's consider the future of bottled water and water bottling on this week's edition of the Guelph Politicast!

 

To learn more about the Wellington Water Watchers, you can go to their website here, and to learn more about the update to Ontario’s Water Quality Management framework, you can click here.

 

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

 

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - July 16, 2020

20Jul

With the literal spectre of death hanging over us, we will convene this week's episode of Open Sources Guelph. On this week's show, we have four very big topics to discuss including the latest on the WE scandal, the latest on the investigation into a downed plane in Iran, and how COVID and cancel culture is destroying America, but the government is talking only one of those seriously.

This Thursday, July 9, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

WE Need to Talk. There seems to be no end in sight as a scandal around a plum government contract for the WE organization has now absorbed Finance Minister Bill Morneau, and Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe, albeit on an entirely different matter. WE now finds itself under a microscope, and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau finds himself under his third ethics investigation in five years, so is Trudeau about to lose the sheen of his better than terrible response to COVID-19?

Plane Truth. Remember before COVID when one of the biggest foreign policy issues of the year was when Ukrainian Air Flight 752 was shot down by Iran? Well, it turns out 176 people were killed due to bad communications and poor alignment. So that's that, right? Not so fast, because this is Iran's own investigation, and others are waiting to finally get a second look at the black box. So what else is left to learn, and what consequences will there be for the Iranian regime?

Casket Case. When President Donald Trump got up in the White House Rose Garden on Tuesday, he talked about almost everything except the fact that the U.S. is rapidly approaching four million cases of COVID-19. Nearly four out of five states are showing increases in cases now, some are returning to lockdown, and expanded Federal employment benefits are running out, while Trump's team publicly demeans the nation's chief virologist. Has COVID defeated America?

Culture Club. The two most controversial words in politics right now is "cancel culture", but what the heck is that? To some people, it means the erosion of speech as some people say the wrong thing and are then inundated by the "liberal mob", but to others it means the democratization of speech and a call to account for outdated thinking and talking points. So is cancel culture a sign of the beast, or is it, as Desmond Cole said, more of a culture of responsibility?

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

End Credits - July 15, 2020 (Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado)

17Jul

This week on End Credits we enter a realm of the mysterious and the unknowable where only the stars have the answer you seek. If you think that's over-the-top wait until you see the subject of this week's review, which is entitled Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado. We'll have that, and we'll also kick-off our latest listicle series featuring a very famous "Steven."

This Wednesday, July 15, at 3 pm, Adam A. Donaldson and Peter Salmon will discuss:

Uneven Stevens Part 1 of 3. Forty-five years ago this summer, Steven Spielberg changed movies forever with the release of Jaws, and that was merely just another step on his run as the most successful filmmaker in 125 years of cinematic history. This week we kick off the definitive* ranking of Spielberg's films with the bottom 12. (*May not actually be definitive.)

REVIEW: Mucho Mucho Amor: The Legend of Walter Mercado (2020). In 1969, Walter Mercado delivered the weekly astrology segment on the local Puerto Rican TV station while dressed flamboyantly for another show, but the gusto of his delivery made him an instant sensation. Fifty years later, Mercado stands as a legend in both the Latinx community as well as the queer community for being a pioneer in non-binary gender conformity, and now everyone can appreciate that legend anew with this Netflix documentary. So how it is?

End Credits is on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca Wednesday at 3 pm.

GUELPH POLITICAST #229 - Black Votes Matter!

15Jul

This is where the hard work of changing the system, and combating systemic racism, begins. For almost two months there have been marches, demonstrations and meetings all designed to promote the cause, but if we’re going to tear down the system, and build something more equitable, it's going to be a more long term fight. So how do we begin? Why don’t we begin with this podcast?

This week, Velma Morgan, the Chair of Operation Black Vote Canada, joins us to talk about how we get more representation for the 18.8 per cent of our population in Guelph who are visible minorities. All things being equal, three of the spots on city council should be represented by People of Colour, which doesn't seem hard, but how do we make People of Colour in our community more comfortable in the council chambers, and how do we make more space for them in our politics?

Morgan's list of accomplishments is too long to list here (you can read them here though), but sufficient to say that her experience in promoting more involvement by Black Canadians in all levels of politics is a good place to start having the discussion. At Operation Black Vote Canada, Morgan and her colleagues run programs to educate, promote and support Black Canadians’ participation in Canada’s political process at all levels and elected offices, whether that’s local boards, or seats in government. Her advice should be essential listening on this topic, so let's listen.

In this episode of the podcast, Morgan will lay out the work of Operation Black Vote Canada, their accomplishments, and the current picture of Black representation at all levels of government here in Canada. She will also talk about voter turnout among Black Canadians, and the extent of the barriers for Black Canadians to get involved in politics. She will discuss the racial bias in municipal politics, what current members of city council should be doing to encourage diversity, and what we all should be doing in our community for the next two years to get more People of Colour involved in politics before the next municipal election.

So let's talk about getting out the vote among our racialized communities on this week's Guelph Politicast!

To learn more about Operation Black Vote Canada, or to take Velma Morgan up on her generous offer for political engagement training, you can find that information on their website here. Keep in mind, the opening of nominations for the 2022 Municipal Election is now less than two years away...

The host for the Guelph Politicast is Podbean. Find more episodes of the Politicast here, or download them on your favourite podcast app at iTunes, Stitcher, Google Play, and Spotify.

Also, when you subscribe to the Guelph Politicast channel and you will also get an episode of Open Sources Guelph every Monday, and an episode of End Credits every Friday.

Open Sources Guelph - July 9, 2020

13Jul

Get some friends together and watch this week's episode of Open Sources Guelph! (Maybe not those ^^^ friends.) We're going to talk about those friends and the disturbing allegations around them, and we're also going to talk about the latest protests erupting from China's newest crackdown in Hong Kong. After that, we're going to catch up (virtually) with a member of our own local city council to talk about some of the latest developments in Guelph news.

This Thursday, July 9, at 5 pm, Scotty Hertz and Adam A. Donaldson will discuss:

Grief of Security. The Chinese government is at it again in Hong Kong, with a brand new security law that basically makes it illegal to be critical of the government, and makes allowances for closed door trials, unlimited wire tapping, and a rather open definition of what can be called 'terrorism.' This was welcomed in the former British colony with about as much enthusiasm as you'd expect. Is this the end of one government/two systems?

Maxwell's House. When Jeffrey Epstein killed himself while in custody in 2019 it was assumed that he took many of his secrets with him to the grave, but as Yoda once said, "There is another." The arrest of Ghislaine Maxwell, Epstein's partner in business and, allegedly, sex trafficking, changes that, and Maxwell's arrest opens the door to finally get answers to questions about Epstein's systematic abuse and how we got away with it for so long. What new insights are we looking for?

James of Mind. For the last few months, Guelph City Council has been carrying out business virtually, and have had to make some pretty big decisions on the fly as new information developed quickly. So let's start talking about that by welcoming back to the show some members of the horseshoe, starting this week with James Gordon. The Ward 2 Councillor will discuss COVID-19, the Black Lives Matter protest, and the impact of the pandemic on his other job as a local rock star.

Open Sources is live on CFRU 93.3 fm and cfru.ca at 5 pm on Thursday.

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